Why I Have the Low Iron

Hello dear friends, on this occasion we will talk to you about a very particular topic that sometimes happens to us all. Even if it is 1 or 2 times in life it has happened to us that the iron is lowered, but here we will give you some tips to overcome this tedious situation.

Feeling tired all the time? Having trouble sleeping? Or are you struggling to find the energy to exercise? If fatigue has become a fact of life and your usual training routine is becoming seriously hard work, it could be one of the millions of people who aren’t getting enough iron.

Iron is essential for energy because it is a building block for red blood cells that carry oxygen around the body, which explains why constant tiredness is a telling sign that you are not getting enough.

WHY I HAVE THE IRON UNDER

cute exhausted puppy, does it feel idly?

If you feel tired all the time or are having trouble sleeping, it could be up to an iron deficiency. Looking very pale and interesting is another sign of iron deficiency, along with the feeling of shortness of breath and being aware of your heartbeat.

But there are many more ways your body might be warning you’re low in iron.

Other clues include headaches, dizziness, tinnitus, hearing sounds that appear to come from inside your body, hair loss, cold hands or feet, difficulty swallowing, itching sensation, altered sleep, lack of appetite, abdominal pain, pain or tongue unusually smooth, or brittle or spoon-shaped nails.

LOW IRON SYMPTOMS

  • Tiredness and lethargy (lack of energy).
  • Difficulty breathing.
  • Heart palpitations (appreciable heartbeats).
  • A pale complexion.

THE LESS COMMON SYMPTOMS

  • Headache.
  • Tinnitus (the sounds of the ear that come from inside the body, rather than from an external source).
  • An altered sense of taste.
  • Itchy feeling.
  • A sore or abnormally smooth tongue.
  • Hair loss.
  • The desire to eat non-food items, such as ice, paper or clay (a condition known as pike).
  • Difficulty swallowing (dysphagia).
  • Painful ulcers (open sores) in the corners of the mouth.

CAUSES OF LOW IRON.

Iron deficiency is the most common cause of anemia. There are many reasons why a person may become deficient in iron, here are them:

INADEQUATE IRON INTAKE.

Eating too little iron for a long amount of time can cause a shortage in your body.

Foods such as meat, eggs and some green leafy vegetables are high in iron. Because iron is essential in times of rapid growth and development, pregnant women and young children may need even more iron-rich foods in their diet.

BACKGROUND OR BLOOD LOSS BECAUSE OF MENSTRUATION.

Heavy menstrual bleeding and blood loss during childbirth are the most common causes of iron deficiency anemia in women of childbearing potential.

INTERNAL BLEEDING.

Certain medical conditions can cause internal bleeding, which can lead to iron deficiency anemia. Examples include an ulcer in the stomach, polyps in the colon or intestines, or colon cancer. Regular use of pain relievers, such as aspirin, can also cause bleeding in the stomach.

INABILITY TO ABSORB IRON.

Certain disorders or surgeries that affect the intestines can also interfere with how your body absorbs iron. Even if you get enough iron in your diet, coeliac disease or bowel surgery such as gastric bypass can limit the amount of iron your body can absorb.

RISK FACTORS FOR LOW IRON.

Anemia is a common condition and can occur in men and women of any age and of any ethnic group.

Some people may be at higher risk for iron deficiency anemia than others, including:

  • Women of childbearing age.
  • Pregnant women.
  • People on poor diets.
  • People who donate blood frequently.
  • Infants and children, especially those born prematurely or experiencing rapid growth.
  • Vegetarians who do not replace meat with other iron-rich foods.

If you’re at risk for iron deficiency anemia, talk to your doctor to determine if blood tests or dietary changes might benefit you.

HOW LOW IRON IS DIAGNOSTIC.

A doctor can diagnose anemia with blood tests. These include:

  • Red blood cells.
  • White blood cells.

A CBC test is often done as part of a routine physical exam. It is a good indicator of a person’s overall health.

It may also be done routinely before surgery. This test is useful for diagnosing this type of anemia because most people who have an iron deficiency don’t realize it.

TREATMENTS FOR LOW IRON.

Below we will mention the treatments for low iron so watch out don’t miss any tips.

IRON SUPPLEMENTS.

Iron tablets can help restore iron levels in your body. If possible, you should take iron pills on an empty stomach, which helps the body absorb them better.

If your stomach bothers you, you can take them with meals. You may need to take the supplements for several months. Iron supplements can cause constipation or black stool.

DIET.

Diets that include the following foods can help treat or prevent iron deficiency:

  • Red meat.
  • Dark green, green leafy vegetables.
  • Dried fruits.
  • Cereals fortified with iron.

In addition, vitamin C helps your body absorb iron. If you are taking iron pills, a doctor may suggest taking the tablets along with a source of vitamin C, such as a glass of orange juice or citrus.

TREATMENT OF THE UNDERLYING CAUSE OF BLEEDING.

Iron supplements won’t help if excess bleeding causes the deficiency. A doctor may prescribe birth control pills to women who have heavy periods. This can reduce the amount of menstrual bleeding each month.

RECOMMENDATIONS FOR LOW IRON.

When inadequate iron intake is caused, iron deficiency anemia can be prevented by eating a diet rich in foods rich in iron and vitamin C. Mothers should make sure to feed their babies breast milk or infant formulas fortified with iron.

Foods high in iron include:

  • Meat, such as lamb, pork, chicken and beef.
  • Pumpkin and pumpkin seeds.
  • Green, like spinach.
  • Raisins and other nuts.
  • Seafood, such as clams, sardines, shrimp and oysters.
  • Dry and instant cereals fortified with iron.

Foods rich in vitamin C include:

  • Fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, strawberries, kiwis, guavas, papayas, pineapples, melons and mangoes.
  • Broccoli.
  • Red and green peppers.
  • Brussels sprouts.
  • green leafy vegetables.

Diagnosing and treating iron deficiency anemia by itself can result in adverse health effects due to excess iron in the blood. Complications of excess iron in the blood include liver damage and constipation. If you have symptoms of iron deficiency anemia, talk to your doctor instead.

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